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20100912
20100912
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SFGTV2 35
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English 35
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
SFGTV2
Sep 11, 2010 9:30pm PDT
>> good morning, everyone, and thank you for joining us. it is my pleasure to be here with our regional fta administrator and our commissioner from san francisco who sits on the metropolitan transportation commission. we have a new development in terms of the muni metro system, one of which is the beginning of the card installation system. we have nine stations that will be receiving newgate's. and we will be adding another 19 disabled fare gates. what we are attempting to do here is replace the infrastructure that has well tapped is useful life in terms of our fair gates, and we are cobbling that at the same time with a nuclear program, which you all should be aware of and which is the regional smart card that will be used throughout the area for public transit trips in the region. the new ticket vending machines -- we have purchased 40 of those ticket vending machines. customers should be able to go to any metro station and purchase tickets that can be used on all of the systems in the metro region. they are multi-lingual machines. they speak in english as well as spanish and
SFGTV2
Sep 11, 2010 8:00pm PDT
who uses the oil and dive into safety by the middle of 2011. we are delighted to be able to use this opportunity. back in october, we had a ground-breaking ceremony for the project as a whole. we had the speaker of the house nancy pelosi with us. the mayor was here, other dignitaries. at the time, we were looking at the oil drive -- doyle drive. we now have a different project for the 21st century. it is an example of what partnership and inventiveness and the full participation of the amazing community of san francisco residents can do to create a project that is really worthy of the amazing natural setting of the presidio park, the largest urban park in the park system. let me start by making some acknowledgements. we have some speakers who i will introduced in a moment, but i am very pleased to welcome to the event, dan representing the speaker's office. i would also like to have very much thank christine from senator feinstein's office, as well as mega miller, a field representative team for senator boxer. in that knowledge and then come i want to the knowledge and leadershi
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 7:00am PDT
'll be talking about the importance of using prescription and over-the-counter medications properly. joining us in our panel today are dr. h. westley clark, director, center for substance abuse treatment, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland; dr. timothy condon, deputy director, national institute on drug abuse, national institutes of health, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland; dr. barbara krantz, chief executive officer and medical director, hanley center, west palm beach, florida; beverly gmerek, prescription drug abuse prevention program coordinator, peer assistance services inc., denver, colorado. dr. clark, how prevalent is prescription drug misuse in the united states? well, we estimate that there are approximately 15 million people who misuse prescription drugs in the united states, and that gives us an estimated 2.5 million new initiates per year, or, if you think about it, that's about 7,000 new initiates a day. and within that, do one age group uses it more than other
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 12:30pm PDT
. and it will come out of laguna honda. all of us should be proud. all of us should be grateful that we have had a small piece of that particular history. because that history helps me bear a lot of responsibility, to be a husband, to be a father. this institution will always be part of my life. you have taught me how to be that better person. thank you very much and god bless all of you. [applause] >> we are so blessed in our elected leaders in san francisco. senator mark leno has helped us on a bill to make sure that people who need help in a community and want to stay in the community can do so. we are very proud of this new building. at the same time, we want to make sure that people who want to stay in their homes will be able to do so. and so the senator has carried a bill that will enable us, if someone has medicaid, to use those medicaid dollars to increase the number of in-home hours that person has so that we can use those federal dollars instead of hospitalization, instead of long-term care here, in the home. our goal is that the person always has the choice as to what is the best set
SFGTV2
Sep 11, 2010 8:30pm PDT
it was barbara boxer that brought us over the edge. guys, this is a legitimate stimulus project. this is a legitimate shot already project that would not have taken place a year ahead of schedule. it saved the taxpayers $90 million. that was for the leadership of speaker policy and president obama. 6200 jobs will be created over the course of this project, direct and indirect. 2600 direct jobs. you're seeing the hard hats and some of those folks. not just pictures. they are here physically with us. their lives have been enhanced because of the stimulus project. it was noted $100 million or more with the tiger grant got us a year ahead of schedule. in 2013 this will be done. what an extraordinary thing. this is right around the corner. this is real time construction and real leadership. thank you, speaker policy. thank you, barbara boxer. thank you, senator feinstein. thank you to jake mgoldrick. we had regional projects related to work on celebrity -- collectively together. he helped organize a from work with the golden gate bridge district and other leaders throughout the regio
SFGTV2
Sep 11, 2010 7:30pm PDT
adults in the community to access and download and then use for community outreach purposes a whole range of materials to help get the word out in a consistent way about prevention and treatment options related to teen prescription drug abuse. as medication use becomes more prevalent in our society for all ages, so too becomes the need to improve the communication about those medicines between the clinicians-the doctors, the pharmacists, other prescribers-and the patient and their support network. samhsa's been a tremendous resource support to ncpie. they've provided resources and also the intellectual information and data that have enabled ncpie to develop resource materials, such as our "teen influencer" program, materials that are available for the community and for teens and parents. ncpie makes sure that it embeds in all its messages and materials information for the general public, for adults and teens about where they can seek out treatment information, including, for example, samhsa's hotline and their "treatment locator." all the wonderful resources that we have, whether th
SFGTV2
Sep 11, 2010 5:30pm PDT
are here to wake up the u.s. senate. we are here to wake them up because if they do not do their jobs you will not have a job, and that is why we need your help and your support and your voice. and we need it loudly and clearly. let me just conclude by thanking each and every one of you. we are going to hear from business leaders that have stepped up to the plate. you are going to hear from some of your friends and colleagues that have actually gotten a chance to give jobs. i am going to ask you, "do not leave. i need you." it infuriates me. the right all these stories that talk about it all the time, but there is not one camera here. that is wrong. i appreciate the crown and the examiner here. i want all of you on the steps. i hope the steps can hold us. we are going to do a family photo. we are going to send it all over the country. no other city has done this. we are going to send it to harry reid. we are going to send it to president obama. we are going to send it back east to congress. so you are not allowed to leave until we do this. but in the interim we are going to hear from peop
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 7:30am PDT
done or what can be done to help us deal with this problem. beverly? we need to make sure parents are aware that this is really an issue and a concern for their youth and that we have community groups in schools and different organizations bring that up. because i think parents, it's kind of under their radar. they're looking for illicit drugs; they're kind of thinking about that and watching for their children, but they're not paying attention to the packages of cough syrup coming into the house or the different things they might find around or maybe different shopping expeditions that their children are taking to the drugstores. and they can work with their local community pharmacies, too, to sort of increase that awareness and make people more aware that this is a prevalent issue and it is a problem, and i think its getting on parents' radar will help a great deal in that respect. we want to keep parents aware that just because, again, it's on the aisle doesn't mean that if it's misused, it's safe. for instance, between 1999 and 2004, there's a sevenfold increase in overdose du
SFGTV2
Sep 11, 2010 5:00pm PDT
into a refinery and we can use it again. they do oil changes and sell it anyway, so now they know when a ticket to a. hal>> to you have something you want to get rid of? >> why throw it away when you can reuse it? >> it can be filtered out and used for other products. >> [speaking spanish] >> it is going to be a good thing for us to take used motor oil from customers. we have a 75-gallon tank that we used and we have someone take it from here to recycle. >> so far, we have 35 people. we have collected 78 gallons, if not more. these are other locations that you can go. it is absolutely free. you just need to have the location open. you are set to go. >> we thought we wouldd< take ts weekly video out on the road. we are here at recology at the recycling center. if you ever wondered where your recyclables go, and this new mandate for composting, the new challenges and mandates around recycling, what we are trying to achieve -- it all starts right here. we just marked an important milestone in our city. i would argue important this nationn francisco has now achieved a 77% diversion rate, the highes
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 9:00am PDT
to our lives. then, what a chef wants, this man will find. tag along with us as we go on a produce pursuit in northern california. then, meet a farmer who is surrounded by his favorite things--his berries and his brothers. finally, think starting a vegetable garden is hard? our expert has advice to get you started and on your way to a homegrown meal in no time. it's all ahead, and it starts now. [captioning made possible by california farm bureau federation] >> so we all know that california is king when it comes to growing citrus. and when it comes to growing lemons, no one is bigger than this ventura county farm. and with over 7,000 acres of lush lemon trees, limoneira isn't just the biggest lemon grower in california, but in all of north america. based in santa paula, the farm is a testament to what hard work and determination can do. foundi fathers nathan blanchard and wallace hardison first bought the land way back in 1893 and named the ranch limoneira, which means "lemon lands" in portuguese. >> and at the time, they wanted to bring about the first full-scale commercial opera
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 1:00pm PDT
. people would have gotten used to her. when he felt we were taking care of he would have moved on. that was his way. instead, she was suddenly catapulted into this job in a much more difficult circumstance than anyone imagined, at a time when everybody was morning. the building was not yet finished. there were a number of challenges. but she rose to all of them. and what she has in common with john is that she wakes up and sees what is in the best interest of the residence. that is what we do this for. it is on that that every decision should be changed. she keeps that foremost in her mind. she has done a fantastic job. i am sure that in that laguna honda corner of heaven, and john is looking down very proudly at her. [applause] >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you for spending your saturday afternoon at laguna honda. at the new laguna honda. san francisco has much to be proud of. laguna honda has been providing compassionate care for san francisco hit safety net for over 150 years. we will continue this tradition for the next 150 years to come. second, the new laguna honda, as
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 10:00am PDT
. because i think their properties taxes are being used for the bond issues and things that get passed. >> one of things i love about the neighborhood, as much as it changes the feel of ocean avenue and the general atmosphere is the ├žsame. you have the same library and park. >> (inaudible) a little old fashion but it combines the best of little old fashion neighborhood that with indion and wine $-bar and 3 irish pubs and just a great number of mom and pop stores. >> when we have friends from out of town or across from town, we walk up the street for dinner. what we have is the best. those who have been here many years and love the city. >> the thing i like the most is the low impact housing. it's, it has a more open feel to it. and there are kids playing the street. >> i like the trees and wide open spaces i have in backyard. and i like the big circle here in (inaudible). >> there is a lot of pride of the family dwellings and maintained. i have lived in 5 neighborhoods in san francisco and in west (inaudible) i have never seen the number of people who know of their neighbors.
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 12:00pm PDT
outlived its usefulness as a place for residents to live. it was no longer consistent with any medicare or medicaid rules. we were the only facility left in the country running open wards. we were told we would not be allowed any longer by both the federal and state authorities. it was a place where, while the care was wonderful, the building did not fit any modern earthquake standards. where privacy was insufficient to support human dignity. where people did not have a place to store their stuff. where people did not have a window to look out on. where we had to have wards that had closing doors because there was not that easy access to the outside. here we had a vibrant set of people -- residents, nurses, doctors, attendants -- but what we lacked was a space that was equal to them. with that, i hope all of you -- looking around the crowd, so many of you did to make this reality. derek parker set the vision of every room with a window. whether it is one of you who voted for this, or one of our wonderful residents who has been a volunteer here. all of you had a role in creating that fac
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 2:00am PDT
. if that is true, i want jerry to tell us whether or not he agrees with that assessment. >> do you agree with that? >> jonathan said something that i absolutely agree with. that is the media reflects what the public wants. in my view, the media, in general, feed a voracious appetite for vengeance by an informed public. often influenced by fear, prejudice, and ignorance. i think one of the reasons criminal defense lawyers argued so poorly is people do not understand the source of crime. they want simple, quick responses to a complicated long- term solutions. you cannot fight crime by doing what the governor is doing, cutting social services and building new prisons. [applause] you do not have to be a rocket scientist to understand. all of us who have been involved in the criminal-justice system know where people who commit crimes come from. they are poor people, people of color, victims of abuse, the mentally ill, people with substance abuse problems. there are the people that fall through the cracks of society. but that is the public read what the public wants and the public is understandably afra
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 2:30am PDT
and all that, it is meaningful to folks like us, but it does not play all that well with people who are afraid of crime, people who are out of work. part of the message has to become it seems to me, going back to the sources of crime, not from an economic point of view, if you want to save money, you should do things that effectively will fight crime, as opposed to making you feel tougher and stronger. also, if you can get part of the message out that it is a tragedy when anyone is wrongfully convicted, for that person, for their family and friends, but the other part is, if there are wrongfully convicted, there is somebody out there who is actually the criminal. part of the message has to be financial. we have been told for years people vote with their pocketbooks, so you have to make a financial analysis. i am certain it would save an enormous amount of money. it also have to get people to understand by making the criminal justice system work, you make yourself safer. not just by feeding your ego or feeding your prejudice, let's get them, let's get them. you never know when you ar
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 3:30pm PDT
have potted plants lining the stairs going up. perhaps the rearguard in, although you never use it, doesn't matter if you don't get sunshine. plant flowers that do not need son. those are oftentimes good ways to spend money on adding value to your home. >> people that are selling their homes do need to have someone that will absolutely come in. i had a stager come in my house. you need to have another i that will absolutely have you get rid of the little things that you think make it look homey and people love it, but the value -- there is a very big value here. it is the same thing as the fluff, but it isn't fluff. paint, or anything else. >> let's talk about staging and what that does. i see a trend toward more staging. what is staging and how important is it? >> staging is when, in the new property or a vacant property, we bring in furniture. it can also be the property you have that is your home, removing your furniture and bringing in someone else's. the goal of staging is to create a neutral, audience-neutral environment where the buyer can imagine themselves without detracti
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 4:00am PDT
not having people in their peer network who use computers in their lives. >> the important thing i learned from caminos was to improve myself personally. when i first came to caminos, i didn't know anything about computers. the second thing is i have become -- i have made some great achievements as an individual in my family and in things of the world. >> it's a real issue of self-empowerment where new immigrant families are able to communicate with their families at home, able to receive news and information in their own home language, really become more and more connected with the world as well as connected even inside their local communities. >> if we value the diversity of our city and we value our diverse neighborhoods in the city, we need to ensure that they remain economically viable. equiping them and equiping residents in those areas with jobs that will enable them to stay in san francisco is critical to that. >> the important thing that i see here at caminos is it helps the low income community, it helps the women who wouldn't have this opportunity otherwise. >> the worke
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 3:00pm PDT
is a different world, isn't it? >> we have so many micro districts and pockets of different the used within two or three blocks. answering the question for one house may not always be the same as answering that question for different house. >> give us an idea. if you get a view, it will be different -- >> shore. the value of a simple remodel verses a very fancy kitchen remodel in a house that might be worth more than a condominium. those things can matter. it can make a difference. >> we have a request from one of our viewers to make sure we talk about -- home-improvement results and building taxes. >> accessible. >> the other thing that might be brought out his people over- improved. there is a fine line. i recommend that my client or anyone talk to realtors before they start. it is a good idea to get an idea of that neighborhood, that house, and how it can be done. >> page 22 of the handout, spend an hour with the pro. talk about what the value means and how it will add value to your home, or if it will be over spending on something that maybe you can do without. >> exactly. >> it is very imp
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 3:30am PDT
francisco, that as human beings, we are not really comfortable with sex. some of us do not even know who we are, right? from day to day, right? you know, i mean, sex is a very complicated issue. the idea that sexual behavior and people's aberrations with it or problems with it or confusions should send them to present for life sentences. in wisconsin, they have the same thing in iowa and illinois -- actually have built prisons just for sex offenders. can you imagine? the entire prison are sex offenders, mostly young men. that is what they are. young men who are confused about their sexuality. as my son was or your son was. i'm going to continue with this, just some of the suggestions we have had. get rid of the word "officer." you have police officers -- isn't that enough? we have, like, 2 million of them. it should be social workers, correctional workers. parole workers. get rid of parole officers and probation officers all together. i call them resource centers so that when somebody comes out of jail or prison, that it would not matter if they came out of a mental hospital or and mentally
SFGTV2
Sep 11, 2010 6:30pm PDT
about the program is the way it is set out allows us to treat the artworks that have the most need, the ones that our conservative have pointed out as the most vulnerable as opposed to ones that might be the most popular were the most miserable -- the most visible. >> it is an opportunity for the public to get involved with these art works located in their backyard and ultimately belong to them. >> i want to do something for the community, just giving back what the community has done for me. it is corny to say, but it is true. it really is what it is. that i would be able to see more pieces cleanup. >>" will check back in the future and see the fruits of conservation and revitalization efforts. if you would find out more or donate to the art carethe artsfartcommission.org. >> hello, i'm meg, welcome to "culture wire." for this episode, the director of cultural affairs, luis, will take you on a journey through presidio has been tet. -- presidio habitat. >> welcome to "culture wire." today i'm at the presidio trust, a treasure within san francisco, because the presidio trust is reall
SFGTV2
Sep 11, 2010 11:30pm PDT
>> can we use this -- i would just read the question. can you use this for a power generator? >> yes. >> that was easy. >> if you just want to do renewable energy, just with the wind energy, we ask that you make a 20% energy improvement because we are trying to get people -- we are encouraging people to save money the best way that they possibly can. and we encourage people to show inefficiency improvement and we will give you the loans for renewable energy. >> and how do you quantify this? this is 30%. you have to certify this with the city, -- >> if your uncle is a certain kind of energy auditor, it will get very technical. but if they have a certain license to conduct certain kinds of energy audits, then they will come in, and they will do the pre-audit and you will do your work. this is where the program is moving in the long term. and because some of these programs are developed in the industry, we have a list of prescriptive measures. the measures that have been proven to be the lowest-hanging fruit, we have a list of those on the web site. and you can do those prescrip
SFGTV2
Sep 11, 2010 10:00pm PDT
used and we have someone take it from here to recycle. >> so far, we have 35 people. we have collected 78 gallons, if not more. these are other locations that you can go. it is absolutely free. you just need to have the location open. you are set to go. >> welcome to culture wire. did you know the city of san francisco has an art collection consisting of 3500 objects? the collection ranges from painting and public buildings to murals, and from bronze busts in city halls, to cite specific structures. at this time, many of the large works are in desperate need of repair, and a long-term innovative solution is needed to make sure these public treasures will be cared for. >> the story of the arts commission program begins with ruth fromstein. 2010 marks her 50th year as an art dealer. at the helm of the county, she had represented some of the most notable of bay area artists, and continues to look for new talent. >> the artists that i represent, what do i choose them, if asked to do with a background of what the gallery is about. i love the idea of finding new guys and watching t
SFGTV2
Sep 11, 2010 11:00pm PDT
of business. we are going to move to the barrier across and then there is nothing that will stop us from raising the bar in terms of sustainability. this is of the rising $150 million for this kind of weatherization. if you are wanting to switch out your light bulbs, and the next- door neighbor has a grade solar project -- has a great solar project, and you say, i want to change out my water heater, or have an electric car that is coming later this year. i have to use this down at work or the big parking garage. now you have the opportunity to do all of these things. you can do all of these things. you can learn how to apply. at the end of the day, we are not just reducing greenhouse gases but also your energy consumption. you are making a good investment in terms of reducing your market costs. finance this on the back of your property tax. so you did not have to pay this back. over the course of five or 20 years. this does not go with you. if you have your home or your industrial building, this is part of the up-front cost of weatherizing your house. the new property will have to be dis
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 12:30am PDT
that actually changed the practice in santa clara. i want to start with amy and if you can tell us what is "ordinary injustice" and how does it manifest itself? >> ordinary injustice happens in a courtroom where there are smart, committed, hard-working people, professionals. but they are routinely acting in ways that fall short. what it is that people and their positions are supposed to be doing. and they don't even realize that anything is missing or that their behavior has devastating consequences for regular people's lives. so this is really the meaning of ordinary injustice that mistakes become routine and the legal professionals can no longer see their role in them. >> can you give us some examples of what you found in your eight-year saga of studying the court system? >> sure. the best way to perhaps get into it is to tell you how i first came across it. i had just graduated law school from stanford and i had clerked for a federal appellate judge in miami and the jurisdiction was florida, alabama and georgia and i wrote a story after my clerkship for the "nation" magazine and it w
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 12:00am PDT
should always be proud of what it is that we do for people and in fact, what they return to us. we are made better by the work that we do and may god bless all of your efforts. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, jose. the event today is also sponsored by the california attorneys for criminal justice. i also want to especially thank the rosenberg foundation and executive director tim solard who provided a grant to make this possible so thank you so much the rosenberg foundation and of course i want to thank all the volunteers who worked so hard to make this event happen today. now i'm very excited to introduce our keynote speaker. our keynote speaker is and was the first "lady lawyer" in california. it's true. because when she decided that she wanted to become a lawyer, there was one problem, the law in california didn't allow it. and so she had to change the law, which she did. she also wanted to go to law school right here at hastings college of law but they had a policy that said only men could go do that law school so she sued hastings college of the law and she changed that an
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 1:00am PDT
from the court to the prosecutors, he had never seen a case that has seen more of use in his career. attorney general holder was right in terms of acting swiftly, in terms of throwing out that condition. he also stated that the department of justice's office of professional responsibility would investigate the actions of the two officers, yet a year after that, we still have heard nothing out of office regarding their conduct. the department of justice has publicly talked about how they increased training in terms of discovery obligations, and they have issued memos in terms of what they are supposed to be doing, yet they have yet to do anything regarding the behavior of those prosecutors. contrast that to the case that occurred a couple years ago, that boasts -- that of the prosecutor in north carolina, where six months after the charges were brought against the lacrosse students, and they were charged with rape, the defense attorneys uncovered evidence in the files, and north carolina is open, but they found evidence in the files showing their clients were innocent. the state atto
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 1:30am PDT
it over, and the judges were telling us, you are making a mountain out of a molehill. little did we know there was all this bubbling underneath, so it is true the onus of the burden is on the defense, because once we have the information we have to file the motion. it is a tremendous amount of work we have to do, but what we need to do is make sure there is a process so people who were convicted can bring their cases back to court. our next question from the audience says, in santa clara county when people plead guilty to misdemeanors, what happened? did they go to jail? for how long? what type of crimes? >> one of the chief dynamics that was happening was that many people were faced with a choice between staying in jail sometimes up to a week or even longer waiting for a public defender to get to their case for just to get out right fair, -- right there, because the judge was basically saying, plead guilty. what is the big deal? that was the impression. everybody was taking the deal. you could almost see them talking to each other. you could see them make that decision. any pointed out
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 3:00am PDT
was the confederate cemetery. from the courthouse, they flew two flags -- the u.s. flag and the confederate battle flag, which was the state flag of south carolina. from the court room, i could look out the window and seaport sumter in the distance -- see fort sumter. they put me on a case with no marijuana. they invented imaginary marijuana. they said i was charged with conspiring to contribute 10 tons of colombian marijuana. i pled not guilty. i had a jury trial. i was found guilty on one account, acquitted on nine. i had an appellate case and the supreme court case. i was then facing 15 years. since may to nine. when i went to federal prison, i did time in eight different states in nine different federal prisons, including four penitentiaries -- that is a maximum security. including the united states penitentiary at marion, the first super federal max. that is on a marijuana convention. -- conviction. i spent most of my time in solitary confinement. you do not know this, but if you plead not duty and you get a jury trial and then you have an appellate case, you go directly to solitary confineme
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 4:30am PDT
can reuse it? >> it can be filtered out and used for other products. >> [speaking spanish] >> it is going to be a good thing for us to take used motor oil from customers. we have a 75-gallon tank that we used and we have someone take it from here to recycle. >> so far, we have 35 people. we have collected 78 gallons, if not more. these are other locations that you can go. it is absolutely free. you just need to have the location open. you are set to go. there is really, only one boy... one girl... one tree... one forest... one ocean... one mountain... one sky... and one simple way to care for it all. please visit earthshare.org and learn how the world's leading environmental groups are working together under one name. earth share. one environment...
SFGTV2
Sep 11, 2010 9:00pm PDT
. not a modest increase in the use and utilization of bicycles once the bike lane has been put in, but a huge increase. talking anywhere from 200% to 300% increase in the use of bicycles once these bike lanes are established. we can conservatively estimate, and these are the numbers that the agency uses, that we would see a 50% increase in the utilization of bicycles when we paid -- as we stripe these bike lanes. you see that with the ability to enhance, and now, you see the enhancements, and that ability is going to follow and i think exceeded everyone's expectations. world-class city is a city that tries to democratize its streets, sidewalks, plazas, playgrounds, public realms. world-class cities now are competing for the best and brightest, and they understand the quality of life is that one differentiated that establishes those that will be the leaders 5, 10, 15, 25 years from now. san francisco does not want to see its world-class status. -- does not want to cede its world-class status. means we have to be a city that is friendly to bicyclist. it means we have to restate that recognizes
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 1:30pm PDT
of the major cities in the u.s. to what is going to be the lead city in the country. >> city working on all sorts of things. we are trying to be new and innovative and go beyond the ada says and make life more successful for people. >> disability rights movement, the city has the overall legal obligation to manage and maintain the accessibility and right of way. with regards to the curb ramps, bounded by a groove border, 12-inch wide border. for people with low vision to get the same information. the shape of the domes, flush transition between the bolt bottom of the ramp and gutter. >> we have a beveled transition on the change in level, tape on the surfaces, temporary asphalt to fill in level changes, flush transition to temporary wood platform and ramp down into the street under the scaffoldinging. detectable ramps. they are all detectable. nothing down below or protruding that people are going to get snagged up on. smooth clean that nobody is going get caught up on. >> our no. 1 issue is what we see here, the uplifting and shreufting to concrete due too street tree roots. here is anothe
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 10:30am PDT
viable, the better off we are. in san francisco there's more dogs than children. finding a viable use for dog poop. >> proenvironmental policies, that's a way to win hearts and that's a way to win hearts and minds. [horns honking] [siren wails] announcer: big dreams and goodrades aren't enough to get into college. there are actual steps you need to take. finding someone who can help is the first and most important. for the next steps, go to knowhow2go.org. >> with my artists, eight of them are working in tehran, iran, the capital city, and one is an iranian american based in san francisco. the problem is really a collective exploration in the day and the life in tehran. it is the largest city in the middle east. for the gallery, one of the first pieces you see is one piece which is a laser-cut peace, it taken directly from the map of the city itself -- a laser-cut piece. it represents the geography of the city. it is positioned right next to another work by an artist who took a 77 taxicab runs and let the potholes and the city turns of tehran dictate how the city would be portrayed. >
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2010 11:00am PDT
are using real energy, energy from the sun, free energy from the sun coming in right here. this converts directly into electricity. >> all these technologies cost money. they don't make economic sense. solar never made economic sense. bio fuels never made economic sense. it's when it was adopted that it started making sense. >> some of them have challenges, that take a long time to prove out, but there's no reason that the challenge of where we will get tomorrow's energy in the united states should not produce a very, very large. >> san francisco is unique in the united states because we serve our own power needs. >> the city of san francisco is well positioned in that we are perfectly located to take advantage of any renewable category. >> we tend to be the last one to figure it all out. it's real people that are saying, enough's enough. . >> the answer is going to be in renewable. the sooner we do something about it, the easier it will be it resolve. >> we're not just talking about what a city can do, we're doing it. >> san francisco has set very aggressive goals for greening the city.
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